The comfort of old media!

Well, maybe it is not the comfort of old media — see also this post on the New Hampshire Gazette —  but the remembrance of uncomfortable history, the recollection of past events and the effort required to preserve fight for democracy, struggle a more perfect union. Administrations lurch along the long arc of the moral universe in its bend towards justice. And it seems to me we’re on our way to peak lurch, but I digress.

The New Hampshire Gazette, (Vol. CCLXII, No. 15, April 13, 2018) reminds us that Viet Nam Veterans had to stand-down the United States Supreme Court some 47 years ago! There was no comfort. It was complicated. Enlisted troops sent to disrupt the protests were contemporaries of the protestors. It was dirty. And the war didn’t end until 1975.

But Viet Nam veterans struggled the union.

Keyboard warrior-ing away in the comfort of Frood’s¹ living room, I’m reminded by a print newspaper that I have been complacent in the belief that the long arc of the moral universe would bend without any action required on my part. But Black Lives Matter marches, the Women’s March on Washington, the March For Our Lives , voting rights, women’s rights, and all the rest — it’s nice to be complicitly lulled into complacency — are reminders that freedom is protected, guarded, and earned by feet in the street and it ain’t easy. It is not comfortable. It is not without risk to livelihood, life and limb in the pursuit of liberty. 

Struggling a more perfect union is work. It has been since 1776.  

Buckle up.


And the print media dramatically reminds us that Wolf the Quarrelsome had a style that our current politicians, try as they might to disembowel us, can only aspire to mimic through enactment of policy, laws, and entanglements.

Keep trying, Ted!


And over the weekend at the annual White House Correspondents annual roast, comedian Michelle Wolf the Quarrelsome disemboweled reminded us that the media — the barking dogs in a race to see who can bark loudest but not longest or rightest — are in on the current ugly lurch.

“You helped create this monster, and now you’re profiting off him.”

Michelle Wolf, April 28, 2018 WHCA dinner

And then to prove that’s how they make their money her point, the media-internet-immediate-Twitter-verse went wild. Apologies ensued from the media to paid pathological liars who pretty as they are or aren’t, lie. Liars in a room full of media barking dogs who can’t take the time to lather find the truth, rinse stick to it, and repeat.

Flint, Michigan is still without drinking water.

Lather, rinse, repeat.

Puerto Rico is still without power.

Lather, rinse, repeat.

I eagerly await the next issue of the New Hampshire Gazette.


¹ Still not her real name, but it’s growing on me. 

Martin Luther King Jr. Day!

BLACK LIVES MATTER.

It is a statement, a sentence, not just a movement, not just a fad.

In a post that is now so last year, I copped to being a ‘Becca’ white woman in the whole of the ‘Becky’ taxonomy.  As stated:

“Keeping in mind that I don’t know what to do or what I’m doing, I will push beyond my Becca-ness of being ‘willing to do the work … but not really.’

I will do work. Really. “

And for me the challenge became discovering a way to 4) Use your privilege to support marginalized movements without drawing attention to … me.  How could I be a quiet, present, and strong ally? Other than pinning up every day which can be seen as an empty gesture used to assuage my own ‘guilt’, how can I be heard without saying a thing?

I’m open to wearing a ‘Black Lives Matter’ t-shirt, but that seems too easy, too obvious, and if the BLM movement doesn’t persist, then what?  And my inner optimist hopes I’d be the butt of a joke for wearing a dated ‘Black Lives Matter’ t-shirt when I’m old, but then my inner cynic says “shut up, systemic racism will be here long after you’re gone.”

Much like pinning up, wearing a slogan t-shirt could be interpreted as an empty gesture. I needed to create something of my own that unapologetically makes the statement ‘Black Lives Matter’, and it struck me while working on another project that Morse Code is the perfect medium.

And so this is my artist’s statement regarding the Black Lives Matter: Morse Code collection:

The challenge is to be a present, silent, strong ally making the clear statement ‘Black Lives Matter.’

Morse Code is heard in the darkness.

Darkness doesn’t see color.

Be seen to be heard.Morse code - BLM freehand (2)

Black Lives Matter.


Black Lives Matter: Morse Code t-shirts, sweatshirts, coffee cups merchandise available from Zazzle via the Viva Boutique Vending page. After-tax profits will be donated to Black Lives Matter. (I get a small % from each sale.)

The BLM: Morse Code design was my own vanity project as I want the statement Black Lives Matter to be as easy and accessible as a Roswell or a Saint Helen of the Blessed Shroud Orphanage t-shirt.


The following is included for fun and advanced reading beyond the basic blog post.

I entered some Viva facts in the 500letters.org Artist Statement Generator and it spit out the following which I thought was spot-on, perceptive, and fun. Not unlike a horoscope. Try it and see what kind of artist you’re meant to be.  “Between our own ‘cannibal’ and ‘civilized’ selves.” Oh? Really.

Viva Escritora

Viva Escritora (United States) is an artist who works in a variety of media. By applying abstraction, Escritora touches various overlapping themes and strategies. Several reoccurring subject matters can be recognized, such as the relation with popular culture and media, working with repetition, provocation and the investigation of the process of expectations.

Her artworks often refer to pop and mass culture. Using written and drawn symbols, a world where light-heartedness rules and where rules are undermined is created. By using popular themes such as sexuality, family structure, and violence, her works references post-colonial theory as well as the avant-garde or the post-modern and the left-wing democratic movement as a form of resistance against the logic of the capitalist market system.

Her work doesn’t reference recognizable form. The results are deconstructed to the extent that meaning is shifted and possible interpretation becomes multifaceted. By demonstrating the omnipresent lingering of a ‘corporate world’, she creates intense personal moments masterfully created by means of rules and omissions, acceptance and refusal, luring the viewer round and round in circles.

Her works demonstrate how life extends beyond its own subjective limits and often tells a story about the effects of global cultural interaction over the latter half of the twentieth century. It challenges the binaries we continually reconstruct between Self and Other, between our own ‘cannibal’ and ‘civilized’ selves.