George Orwell on blogging.

For all of the references to George Orwell’s 1984 predicting the age of Newspeak, government control, war is peace, etc. the pundits forgot to remind us that Orwell captured the essence of blogging:

“It was curious that he seemed to not merely to have lost the power of expressing himself, but even to have forgotten what it was that he had originally intended to say.”

And here we are off on Vivacation! A place of peace at last for a bit of solitude and reflection with the exception of jack-hammering away a concrete pier, the coming and going of trucks taking loads of busted stuff off to where or away, the high-pitched hum of a mosquito landing strip close by …

Aside from all of these things, setting all these things aside …

We set off to make a point …

Which was …

Something something … Orwell …

Ah yes! Blogging and the power of words. Isn’t it wonderful that 33 years past the actual year of 1984, I am reading or rereading, I don’t recall — the plot, the characters, the words seem so familiar and yet so new —  the book 1984?  And that the power of words published in 1949 reach through time and capture this blogger’s lament? Timeless.

The struggle is real.

1984: Doublespeak & News peak

The first time I read 1984 by George Orwell for an English class, Ronald Reagan was POTUS. And the class discussed the book in context of Mr. Orwell and his experience and history. I did not think I would have a compelling reason to ever reread this book. But no. 1984 may be a survival guide to communications during the Trump Administration. So I’ll jump on the library cart, help sustain Mr. Orwell’s thriving posthumous career, and I will reread 1984.
In addition to “alternative facts” (Kellyanne Conway) and a new interpretation of “complicit” (Ivanka Trump), I would like to suggest the following be added to the doublespeak lexicon:

Pretend news

Fake news is negative. But pretending! Remember pretending as a a child? Pretending is fun, pretending is creative.  Pretend news sounds so much better than fake news, and what’s the difference really? We were just pretending …

News manufacturer

An organization that specializes in the synthesis of events, facts, opinions, decisions into a format acceptable to their audience.

I suggest that News manufacturer replace news media.   The word media emphasizes the delivery method, whether it be print, web, image, video, over the process that morphs and forms an event into an item of news.  Manufacturer also highlights the business aspect of news and as such, there are many manufacturing models. Manufacturing removes gravitas and the assumed independence that we had come to expect from the news media as the 4th estate. As manufacturers, we can expect less from our news media, more or less.

High ethics

High ethics are the rules of conduct recognized as applying to a particular class of humans who play by their own rules and operate above, below, and outside the laws applicable to common people.

Example:

Donald Trump uses high ethics to define the separation between the Trump Organization and his position as POTUS.

And finally, instead of parsing newspeak as new speak, I suggest ‘news peak.’

News peak

News peak is an unprecedented and overwhelming number of headline events occurring during a single news cycle. In my opinion, a news peak event happened yesterday, Thursday, April 13, 2017.   Just as I was reading that we dropped a MOAB on ISIS, I read that the US accidentally hit 18 allies in the Syrian bombing, Planned Parenthood is being defunded, Anderson Cooper‘s uncharacteristic reaction during a discussion of foreign policy, and on and on.

And an example of news peaks (pl.) used in a paragraph:

It’s so incredible, it’s brilliant, we are going to have an unbelievable, perhaps record-setting number of news peaks during this administration. You won’t believe all the earth-changing news being made all over, all over and all the time during this administration. You’ve never read as much news. Just wait. Believe me.  We’ll make news.

Brush off your dictionaries.  Buckle up.